Gallows Hill Magazine

Hey everyone, I wanted to let you know about the latest place to catch one of my stories.

In October, there’s a new horror magazine starting up called Gallows Hill Magazine. It’s run by author/editor/publisher Joshua Demarest.

The inaugural issue contains an interview with Father Gary Thomas, America’s leading exorcist and inspiration behind the movie The Rite.

It also features an in-depth interview with Richard Chizmar, author and founder of the long running and highly successful magazine Cemetery Dance. If you’ve read horror for a long time, you should be familiar with Cemetery Dance.

gh-alternate-cover-100-1-1The issue contains writing tips and a calendar of horror genre events.

It seems like a solid offering for a start-up magazine and amongst all this goodness are two (only two!) short stories. One of them is by author T.J. Tranchell and the other is mine! I remember seeing the call for submissions and figured “why not?” I’m so fortunate I did. I can’t express how humbled and excited I am to be part of something so amazing!

Please consider pre-ordering this new magazine. If not to support my story, do so because of all the awesomeness involved. If you’re a horror fan, you’ve gotta check it out. I can tell you from experience that Joshua is excellent to work with and has high standards. I imagine the magazine will certainly carry on those traits.

Pre-order it here: Gallows Hill Magazine

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Review: Nonlocal Science Fiction (Issue #1)

There are numerous excellent science fiction and fantasy journals, e-zines, and magazines out there for consumption. Publications such as Fantasy and Science Fiction, Azimov’s, Lightspeed, Clarkesworld, and others offer exciting and well written stories by proven and up-and-coming writers. There really isn’t a lack of options when it comes to great science fiction and fantasy.  So where does Nonlocal Science Fiction add to this already well represented field?

Nonlocal Science Fiction is a quarterly anthology published by 33rd Street Digital Press. According to its website, the primary focus is to “expand the science fiction genre by working mainly with new and independent authors and giving them a legitimate outlet for their work.”

At first glance, Issue #1 (published in March of 2015) comes across as a well constructed work. The cover art is tremendous and the formatting and general look of the inside is high quality. I was quite surprised on opening the anthology at how well it looked. Though it was their first offering,  it didn’t suffer from lack of organization or direction. It was clear a lot of effort was put into it.

Going beyond the aesthetics, the writing was pretty darn good as well.

I’ve fallen victim to the pretty book cover of an indie author only to be disappointed by stories with flimsy plots or barely intelligible prose. However there are those moments when I find an indie author and instantly have a new favorite writer (Luke Smitherd, Teresa Lo, and Jennifer Wells just to name a few)

Nonlocal Science Fiction brings a platform to expose new authors to those who might not find them otherwise and they do so for less than a cup of coffee at most places.

The stories range from space exploration to westerns to time travel to world building. The diverse stories provide an eclectic yet interesting mix of voice from emerging writers. This first volume also includes two serials which are sure to keep readers coming back for more.

A few stand-out stories include “Marigold’s Memories” by Reva Russell English about wanting to remove certain memories, “Shoot the Devil” by Nicholas C. Rossis; an interesting time travel piece, and “Catalyst” by Aaron Hamilton; a creation story with a twist. The writing is crisp and the stories engaging.

Not to say that Nonlocal Science Fiction will soon be the “it” place for writers, it does hold its own as a viable, affordable source for great writing by authors unknown to most readers. For the cover price of $2.99 per issue, it’s hard to say it’s not worth it.

You can find issues of Nonlocal Science Fiction on Amazon or through links on their website.

Give it a try. You might find your new favorite writer!